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Rendered at 11:18:23 10/01/14
Neverfail
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Antique Root-Heath Never Fail Cast Iron Corn Sheller, Husker Shucker 1904-1919

Priced at
$109.95
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Item details

Category
Qty Available
Only one in stock, order soon
Date Of Creation
1900-1949
Region Of Origin
US, Non-specific region
Style
Naive, Primitive
Material
Metal
Original/ Reproduction
Original
Size Type/ Largest Dimension
Small (Up to 14'')
Signed?
Unsigned
Listed By
Dealer or Reseller
Condition
Good - average wear
Type
Metal/Ironwork

More about this item

macleay

 

These are actually a corn sheller, (removes the corn kernels from the cob), but I noticed a lot of sellers call them a husker or shucker, (A husker or shucker is one that removes the husk, usually by hand, but there was a tool made that you held in your hand to slit the husk with).

Okay, trivia over.

Looks to be in good condition.
Other than turning the crank, it is un-tested by me.
These were manufactured between 1904 and 1919.
In 1904 The Root Brothers Co. became the Root-Heath Mfg. Co.
In 1919, another company was added, resulting in the Fate-Root-Heath Co.

There was another sheller made around this time with the Heath name, (also from Plymouth), and was called the Ideal.<br>One sold here on eBay for $310 plus shipping,(without handle), (item # 160656611224.

Only comes with what is described and shown in my photos in the description area.
All our listed items are as found, but I might have wiped dust off or something minor like that.
Absolutely no repairs are done to any items unless stated in the listing, (Very rare).
Any damage or repairs that are found will always be noted.
If something needs testing, we will state what was tested, with our results, and the limit of any testing done.

Please don’t hesitate to ask ANY questions. We strive for you to enjoy your shopping with us.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

We combine shipping whenever possible.

 

“International Buyers – Please Note:
Import duties, taxes and charges are NOT included in the item price or shipping charges.
There is a ten dollar handling charge included with the calculated shipping price.
These charges are the buyer’s responsibility. Please check with your country’s customs office to determine what these additional costs will be prior to bidding/buying.”

ALSO, for international shipping, we will NOT ship ANYTHING using the small flat-rate box or envelope or 1st class mail, as there is no insurance or tracking available for these shipping methods.

Thank you.

 

 

Listing details

Seller policies
Shipping discount
No combined shipping offered
Posted for sale
More than a week ago
Item number

41990544

Priced $109.95. Categorized under Antiques >> Primitives. Date of Creation: 1900-1949, Region of Origin: US, Non-specific region, Style: Naive, Primitive, Material: Metal, Original/ Reproduction: Original, Size Type/ Largest Dimension: Small (Up to 14''), Signed?: Unsigned, Listed By: Dealer or Reseller, Condition: Good - average wear, Type: Metal/Ironwork. macleay These are actualy a corn sheler, removes the corn kernels from the cob, but I noticed a lot of selers cal them a husker or shucker, A husker or shucker is one that removes the husk, usualy by hand, but there was a tol mad.