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WYOMING Green River Cliffs - Engraving Antique Print

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Martin2001 Antique Prints

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Only one in stock, order soon
Edition Type
Limited Edition
Subject
Architecture & Cityscape
Date of Creation
1800-1899
Style
Vintage
Original/Reproduction
Original Print
Listed By
Dealer or Reseller
Size Type/Largest Dimension
Medium (Up to 30in.)
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Unsigned
Signed?
Unsigned
Condition
Used

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!!! NOTE !!! if the image(s) in the description shows a broken image icon(s), right click on the icon(s) and open in new tab to see the larger image(s). Green River, Wyoming Another Quality Print from Martin2001 Type of print: Wood engraving - Original antique print Year of printing: c 1880 Artist - Engraver - Publisher: Thomas Moran - n/a - Heinrich Schmidt, Leipzig Condition: Excellent - Very good - Good - Fair Size of print in inches: incl. blank margins around the image: 9 1/2 x 13 (image size: 6 x 9), 1 inch = 2,54 cm Type of paper: Thick - Heavier - Medium heavy - Thin Reverse side: Blank - With text or pictures Notes: --- Description: From the original description: The Wyoming border crossed, a new region is entered. The Plains do not end, but they are already closely bordered, within sight, by the far-outlying spurs of the Rocky Mountains. Beyond the civilized oasis of Cheyenne, the scenery takes on a darker look, and, if one chances to come to the little station of Medicine Bow when the sunset begins to cast long shadows from the black mountains on the southern side of the North Fork of the Platte, there is something almost sombre in the aspect of the shaded plain. The Laramie plains have just been passed; indeed, they still lie to the northward. Hills break the monotony of their horizon, and here and there the regular forms of castellated buttes-stand out sharply against the sky. The far-off Red Buttes are most noteworthy and most picturesque of these; grouped together like giant fortresses, with fantastic towers and walls, they lift ragged edges above the prairie, looking lonely, weird, and strong. Among the singular shapes their masses of stone assume, the strangely-formed and pillar-like Dial Rocks tower up -- four columns of worn and scarred sandstone, like the supports of some ruined cromlech built by giants. About them, and, indeed, through the whole region about the little settlements and army-posts, from the place called Wyoming, on to Bitter Creek ominously named the country is a barren, unproductive waste. The curse of the sage-brush, and even of alkali, is upon it, and it is dreary and gloomy everywhere save on the hills. Only with the approach to Green River does the verdure come again--and then only here and there, generally close by the river-bank. Here the picturesque forms of the buttes reappear a welcome relief to the monotony that has marked the outlook during the miles of level desert that are past. The distance, too, is changed, and no longer is like the great surface of a sea. To the north, forming the horizon, stretches the Wind-River Range named with a breezy poetry that we miss in the later nomenclature of the race that has followed after the pioneers. To the south lie the Uintah Mountains. At some little distance from the railway the great Black Buttes rise up for hundreds of feet, terminating in round and rough-ribbed towers. And other detached columns of stone stand near them the Pilot, seen far off in the view that Mr. Moran has drawn of the river and its cliffs. And through all this region fantastic forms abound everywhere, the architecture of Nature exhibited in sport. An Eastern journalist a traveller here in the first days of the Pacific Railway has best enumerated the varied shapes. All about one, he says, lie "long, wide troughs, as of departed rivers; long, level embankments, as of railroad-tracks or endless fortifications; huge, quaint hills, suddenly rising from the plain, bearing fantastic shapes; great square mounds of rock and earth, half-formed, half-broken pyramids it would seem as if a generation of giants had built and buried here, and left their work to awe and humble a puny succession." --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Martin2001 Satisfaction Guaranteed Policy ! Any print purchased from us may be returned for any reason for a full refund including all postage. Powered by Turbo Lister The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.

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Items after first shipped each discounted 90.0%
Posted for sale
More than a week ago
Item number

351540832

Product reviews for "Martin2001 Print"

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TURKEY Trebizond on Black Sea - 1887 Wood Engraving

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This old engraving has substantiated and stimulated a recent interest of mine; this physical thing now hangs in front of my reading chair, and I have found the digital copy of the charming old book from which it was cut (VOYAGES AND TRAVELS OR SCENES IN MANY LANDS VOLUME
de Colange, Leo (Ed.)).
Published by E.W. Walker, Boston, MA (1887))
I recommend enjoying some of the 19th century paintings under "Trabzon in art" in commons.wikipedia., which is where I first discovered this one. In some of these it is the artists viewpoint of serious (not ) peacefulness that I especially enjoy, and now this is substantiated, in front of my reading chair.

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