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Rendered at 23:53:21 02/19/18
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1932 Skyscraper Souls Photoplay Maureen O'Sullivan

$12.00
OBO

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Item Description

'SKYSCRAPER SOULS' Photoplay Edition of 'SKYSCRAPER' by FAITH BALDWIN with MOVIE STILLS FROM THE MGM PICTURE Starring: WARREN WILLIAM MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN ANITA PAGE JEAN HERSHOLT VEREE TEASDALE WALLACE FORD HEDDA HOPPER NORMAN FOSTER 1932 First Photoplay Edition GROSSET DUNLAP NEW YORK Hardcover, 319 pages plus 9 pages publisher's advertisments Faith Baldwin's 1931 classic pulp romance Skyscraper is as pulp as it comes. If you like your prose purple and your entendres doubled, this is the book for you. It's a combo of Donald Trump and Conrad Black in the aftermath of the 1929 Stock Market Crash Great Depression era played in the movie by Warren William. His character, Dave Dwight is a ruthless tycoon who has just built a a building which is supposed to tower even above the majestic Empire State structure. In the movie there are the financial fights, the snaring of a good-hearted soul named Norton, who enters into a big business deal with Dwight while they are in a Turkish bath, and the greedy speculators who are caught in a shrewdly manipulated stock dÄ‚Å bÄ‚Ëcle. (A more timely vintage photoplay there could not be!) Tender morsel Maureen O'Sullivan is wooed by one of those obnoxious, dunderheaded mashers who populate Depression-era films. There is something decidedly creepy about Norman Foster's relentless pursuit of her, and he is quick to sense any imagined infidelity, perhaps because his own randy nature is so indiscriminate. "Skyscraper Souls" is something of a poor man's "Grand Hotel." Instead of the Barrymore brothers, Greta Garbo, Wallace Beery, and Joan Crawford, we get Warren William, Jean Hersholt, Hedda Hopper, and Maureen O'Sullivan, but as was often the case in the 30s, MGM's second team plays as well as their first. For all its stars, "Grand Hotel" now seems pretty creaky. "Skyscraper Souls" is it's polar opposite. Although New York is in the grip of the Great Depression, you can't help but be swept up in the picture's vitality. "Skyscraper Souls" moves at a fast pace and its multiple plot lines mesh together quite well. Although it was made 70 years ago, both the financial and romantic entanglements seem very modern. Dave Dwight certainly would be at home in today's board room and most of the women come across as surprisingly contemporary. This is a scare photoplay book containing all four black white stills from the movie. BOOK DESCRIPTION/CONDITION: First Photoplay Edition. No jacket. 12mo - over 6Â" - 7Â" tall. Blue cloth hardcover with silhouette skyline illustratin in black on front and title printed black on spine. Blue top edge. Some minor cover wear, spine ends and corner tips. All plate illustrations present. One small page smudge and closed tear noted but overall interior condition Very Good. 5 1/4" x 7 5/8" x 1 1/4"

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Category:

Antiquarian & Collectible

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Condition:

Used

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Items after first shipped each discounted $1.00

Posted for sale:

More than a week ago

Item number:

960722

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