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419uovb7yhl. sl1500
419uovb7yhl. sl1500

Ancient Greek Bronze Museum Statue Replica of Discus Thrower of Myron (1167)

$43.12

Shipping options

Estimated to arrive by Thu, Jun 6th. Details
$7.37 via Economy shipping (1 to 10 business days) to United States
Ships from Greece Gr

Return policy

Full refund available within 30 days

Purchase protection

Catalog info

Payment options

Shipping options

Estimated to arrive by Thu, Jun 6th. Details
$7.37 via Economy shipping (1 to 10 business days) to United States
Ships from Greece Gr

Return policy

Full refund available within 30 days

Purchase protection

Catalog info

Payment options

Item traits

Category:

Home Décor

Quantity Available:

20 in stock

Condition:

New

MPN:

1167

ASIN:

B00GGL1YES

binding:

Kitchen

format:

Kitchen

manufacturer:

Handmade

Brand:

Iconsgr

Listing details

Price discount:

5% off w/ $50.00 spent

Posted for sale:

More than a week ago

Item number:

239273337

Item description

Ancient Greek Bronze Museum Statue Replica Of Discus Thrower Of Myron CODE:1167 Dimensions: 11x6 cm or 4.34x2.37 in Weight: 200gr Material: BRONZE Color: MUSEUM OXIDIGATITION This is a handmade Museum Statue Replica Of Discus Thrower Of Myron made in Greece, from 100% bronze using the traditional lost wax technique. This is the same technique used by the ancient Greeks to create bronze sculptures and arsenal. The prototype which it was made by is a museum exhibit. The Museum color is given through the process of oxidization Ancient Greek Bronze Museum Statue Replica Of Discus Thrower Of Myron Dimensions: 11x6 cm or 4.34x2.37 in Material: BRONZE Color: MUSEUM OXIDIGATITION The Diskobolus of Myron ("discus thrower" Greek Δισκοβόλος, "Diskobólos") is a Greek sculpture that was completed towards the end of the Severe period, circa 460-450 BC. The original Greek bronze is lost but the work is known through numerous Roman copies, both full-scale ones in marble, which was cheaper than bronze,[1] such as the first to be recovered, the PalombaraDiscopolus, or smaller scaled versions in bronze. A discus thrower is depicted about to release his throw: "by sheer intelligence", Kenneth Clark observed in The Nude, "Myron has created the enduring pattern of athletic energy. He has taken a moment of action so transitory that students of athletics still debate if it is feasible, and he has given it the completeness of a cameo." The moment thus captured in the statue is an example of rhythmos, harmony and balance. Myron is often credited with being the first sculptor to master this style. Naturally, as always in Greek athletics, the Discobolus is completely nude. His pose is said to be unnatural to a human, and today considered a rather inefficient way to throw the discus. Also there is very little emotion shown in the discus thrower's face, and "to a modern eye, it may seem that Myron's desire for perfection has made him suppress too rigorously the sense of strain in the individual muscles,"[2] Clark observes. The other trademark of Myron embodied in this sculpture is how well the body is proportioned, the symmetria. The potential energy expressed in this sculpture's tightly-wound pose, expressing the moment of stasis just before the release, is an example of the advancement of Classical sculpture from Archaic. The torso shows no muscular strain, however, even though the limbs are outflung. Additional Details ------------------------------ Package quantity: 1