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Clyde mc culrough catcher baseball 001
Clyde mc culrough catcher baseball 001
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J.C. Higgins Rare Clyde Mc Culrough catcher baseball mit1672

$595.00

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Ships in 3 business days Details
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Full refund available within 30 days

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Item number:

40470618

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......................................................OBO............................................... J.C. Higgins Rare Antique Clyde Mc Culrough catcher baseball Mit #1672 595.00 Remembering Clyde McCullough Clyde E. McCullough was born on March 4, 1917, in Nashville, Tennessee. He attended Hume-Fogg High School and signed with the Lafayette White Sox of the Class D Evangeline League in 1935. In 130 games the young catcher batted .263 and joined the Yankees organization in 1936, playing with the Akron Yankees of the Class C Mid-Atlantic League. McCullough batted .307 with nine home runs at Akron and was with the Binghamton Triplets of the Class A New York-Penn League in 1937, where he continued to prove he could hit with a .329 average. In 1938, McCullough spent time between Binghamton, Newark and Kansas City, and stuck with the Kansas City Blues of the Class AA American Association for 1939, batting .277 in 108 games with 11 home runs. Despite having a seemingly promising career ahead of him as a Yankee, McCullough was purchased by the Chicago Cubs in September 1939, and made his debut at the major league level on April 28, 1940. Appearing in nine games for the Cubs, the 23-year-old batted .156 before being assigned to the Buffalo Bisons of the Class AA International League. McCullough batted .324 in 145 games with 27 home runs to ensure it would be his last season in the minors for many years. McCullough was the Cubs starting catcher in 1941. He played 125 games and batted .227 with nine home runs, and ironically hit at least one in each National League park. He raised his average to .282 the following season and batted .237 in 1943. McCullough entered service with the Navy in December 1943, and was stationed at Great Lakes Naval Station in Illinois, where he played baseball in 1944 for Mickey Cochrane. McCullough was batting .293 when he broke two bones in his hand and was lost for the season. He transferred to Norfolk Naval Training Station, Virginia, in 1945, where he continued to play baseball and also met Anne Caris, whom he later married. Having attained the rank of Chief Petty Officer, McCullough was discharged from the Navy on Thursday, September 27, 1945, notifying Cubs vice-president Jim Gallagher that he had been playing baseball regularly and was “in good condition.” He joined the Cubs in Pittsburgh for the final two days of the season but did not play. However, he made a pinch hit appearance in the 1945 World Series against the Detroit Tigers (he was called out on strikes against Hal Newhouser), making him the only player to have appeared in a World Series without playing a regular-season game in the same year. McCullough was with the Cubs for the next three seasons and was a National League all-star in 1948. He was traded to the Pirates in December of that year and remained with the them for four seasons before returning to the Cubs in 1953 and, at the age of 36, making his second all-star appearance. In May 1955, he caught Sam Jones’ no-hitter against Pittsburgh at Wrigley Field. “I didn’t even think about a no-hitter the first five or six innings,” he later remarked. “You know, winning the ball game is the important thing. But in the eighth I figured Sam might do it with the utmost help of God. I told Sam to just get the ball down the middle and let ‘em hit it. Then, in the ninth, he walked the first three hitters. I went out to the mound to have a talk with him.” His exact words to Jones were, “Sam, one more walk and yer outta there.” Jones struck out Dick Groat, Roberto Clemente and Frank Thomas, in succession to preserve the masterpiece. After the game, Jones said, “Most of the credit should go to Mac. That man sure knows how to handle pitchers.” McCullough remained with the Cubs until 1956 and ended his playing days – aged 40 - with the Miami Marlins of the Class AAA International League in 1957. The following year, he began managing in the minors with the Reading Indians of the Class A Eastern League. He worked as a major league coach with the Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins (1960-61), New York Mets (1963) and San Diego Padres (1982). He was a manager and instructor in the Mets' farm system during the 1960s when the club developed young pitchers such as Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan, Jerry Koosman and Tug McGraw. Clyde McCullough was a bullpen coach with the Padres when he was found dead in his hotel room in San Francisco, during a road trip on September 18, 1982. He was 65 years old and is buried at Rosewood Memorial Park Cemetery, Virginia Beach, Virginia. ---------------------595.00 ------------------------------OBO--------------------------------------------------------
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