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MEXICO Indian Village at Huexoculco Pueblo - 1891 Antique Print Engraving

$20.25
$22.50
Top-Rated Seller

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Estimated to arrive by Thu, Aug 23rd. Details
$3.30 via USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) to United States

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OBO - Seller accepts offers on this item. Details

Return policy

Full refund available within 30 days Details

Purchase protection

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Top-Rated Seller

Shipping options

Estimated to arrive by Thu, Aug 23rd. Details
$3.30 via USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) to United States

Offer policy

OBO - Seller accepts offers on this item. Details

Return policy

Full refund available within 30 days Details

Purchase protection

Payment options

Item traits

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Category:

Art Prints

Quantity Available:

Only one in stock, order soon

Condition:

Used

Style:

Vintage

Original/Reproduction:

Original Print

Print Type:

Woodcut & Block

Listed By:

Martin2001

Medium:

Paper

Date of Creation:

1891

Features:

Not-framed

Subject:

Central America

Listing details

Seller policies:

View seller policies

Shipping discount:

Items after first shipped each discounted 90.0% | Free shipping on orders over $50.00

Price discount:

15% off w/ $60.00 spent

Posted for sale:

July 19

Item number:

614486381

Item description

Print title: Indian Village. View Taken at the Huexoculco Pueblo. Province of Mexico Print Specifics: Type of print: Wood Engraving - Original antique print Year of printing: not indicated in the print - actual 1891 Publisher: D. Appleton Co., New York. Condition: 1 (1. Excellent - 2. Very good - 3. Good - 4. Fair) Very light age toning of paper. Dimensions: x 10.5 inches (17,5 x 26 cm), including blank margins (borders) around the image. Paper weight: 3 (1. Thick - 2. Heavier - 3. Medium heavy - 4. Slightly heavier - 5. Thin) Reverse side: Blank Notes: 1. Green color 'border' around the print in the photo is a contrasting background on which the print was photographed. Narrative: Indians are slightly mixed, while the so-called “pure” whites will occasionally boast of their descent from the ancient rulers of the land. No less than three families jealously preserve in Mexico and Spain the records tracing their lineage back to Montezuma. On the other hand the African element never acquired any importance in Mexico, although negroes were introduced from the first years of the conquest. But after an insurrection, suppressed by drastic measures, the Spanish landowners were forbidden to purchase Africans in order to replace the natives. In any case the black race could scarcely have become acclimatised in the cold regions of the plateau. At present the negroes are almost exclusively confined to the towns of the seaboard, and these have come for the most part from Cuba and Jamaica. In the whole of Mexico they do not appear to exceed 20,000 persons. During the three centuries of colonial administration between the fall of Tenochtitlan and the proclamation of Mexican independence, the one great event in the national history may be said to have been this slow formation of the Mestizo race from Nahua and Iberian elements. Doubtless the full-blood Spaniards, constituting the first social caste, continued to keep haughtily aloof, claiming the exclusive right to the title of gente de razon, or “rational beings.” But they were divided amongst themselves; to the Spaniards born in the Peninsula were reserved the lucrative offices, as well as all honours and authority. But the Creoles, however pure their blood, however great their merits, were kept in the background; they were even refused admittance to a large number of the monastic establishments. By the very fact of their birth in the New World they seemed to have almost ceased to be Spaniards and were insulted at every turn. But this treatment was bitterly resented, and until recently the term usually applied to the Spaniards by birth was Gachupines, derived from two Nahuatl words meaning “Men of the Spurs.” “Mueran los Gachupines” (“Death to the Gachupines!”) was the war-cry of the insurgents. The Indians properly so called, whether wild or mansos, that is, “civilised,” were also regarded as inferiors, beings intermediate between man and animals. On some rare occasions acts of courage or devotion might perhaps earn for a native recognition as a brother, and then he was raised to the rank of hombre blanco or “a white,” as if great qualities were incompatible with the nature of the red man. But the true feeling was embodied in the current Mexican saying that an Indian would never rule the land so long as there remained a muleteer from La Mancha or a Castilian cobbler. Martin2001 Satisfaction Guaranteed Policy! Any print purchased from me may be returned for any (or no) reason for a full refund including all postage. seller since 1998. Five-star service.
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