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Strawberry Road-Yoshimi Ishikawa:JAPANESE IN CALIFORNIA

$9.99

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Category:

Nonfiction

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Condition:

Very Good

Category:

Biography & Memoir

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Posted for sale:

More than a week ago

Item number:

11726621

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Strawberry Road by YOSHIMA ISHIKAWA (AUTHOR) EVE ZIMMERMAN (TRANSLATOR) Hardcover: 263 pages Publisher: Kodansha International (JPN); 1st ed edition (April 1991) Language: English ISBN-10: 4770015518 ISBN-13: 978-4770015518 Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 1 inches Shipping Weight: 1 pounds LIST PRICE: 19.95 From Publishers Weekly In this Japanese bestseller, slated for film release in the U.S. and Japan later this year, the author recalls his adventures and misadventures as a teenager studying and working on his brother's California strawberry farm during four years of the turbulent '60s. An appealing, often humorous account, translated into sometimes halting "Japlish," it reflects Ishikawa's struggles to learn English and adapt to American customs as this astute observer vividly evokes the opportunities, dashed hopes and groping patriotism of immigrant would-be Americans. A gallery of exotic characters people the narrative--Haight-Ashbury hippies, illegal Mexican fruit pickers and prostitutes, Japanese issei and nisei still bitter about their WW II internments, and farmers and entrepreneurs who--like Ishikawa's brother--married American citizens to provide other Japanese family members green card entry to the U.S. Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal It is 1965 and Japan has not yet achieved its "economic miracle" status. Yoshimi Ishikawa leaves home on the tiny island of Oshima to join his brother, who has emigrated to a farm in Southern California. In his memoirs, Ishikawa limns a unique slice of rural life during a time of rapid transition when Japanese "blanket men" still roamed the countryside in search of work; when Japanese bankers drove miles to collect meager deposits from their compatriots; when Cesar Chavez conducted his famous boycott and strike of 1966. Partly a coming-of-age tale, Ishikawa's narrative is lively and humorous--best in its descriptions of the poignant relations between different generations of Japanese in the United States; weakest in its social analysis (for example, he erroneously claims that it was the Japanese press--not the Japanese-Ameri cans--who began the public outcry against the U.S. detention camps). A best seller in Japan, this title belongs in immigrant collections and in libraries with Asian-American clientele. Book Description Wide-eyed and vigilant, Yoshimi Ishikawa steps off his immigrant ship in the summer of 1965 to join his brother Daiku on a strawberry farm near Pomona, California. He is an expectant teenager, eager to get his hands on the buxom blondes and easy money he's heard so much about. He finds instead a run-down shack in an endless field and his brother's willful, sometimes blind, determination to "make it" in America. Ishi embarks on a search for free love and community while his brother tries to plant economic roots in the shifting sands of rural California--among the Mexican immigrants and the first- and second-generation Japanese settlers, some still bearing scars from the internment camps. Gradually, Ishi fashions himself a new life. At school, his Japanese-American buddy Frankie Noda initiates him into the do's and don'ts of sports, study, and American dating. On the farm, he watches as his brother's boss and mentor becomes hopelessly entangled with a quack Japanese-American telephone guru. On the road, he finds himself sitting Zen with the hippies of Haight-Ashbury and discovers first love with an older Japanese divorcee. Through his experiences he develops a love for soil, water, and the farming life; a nose for the nearly imperceptible shifts in California's weather; and a new appreciation for the vivid seasons of his homeland. Along the way he creates unforgettable portraits of the heroes and anti-heroes of the Japanese-American dream: the retired "blanket man" who lives alone in a hut with 60 years of savings in his mattress; the boisterous Mexicans next door with their hideouts to escape the immigration authorities; Sensei, the Christian antiwar minister and our hero's mentor; the itinerant right-wing calligrapher who likes to sell to unsuspecting Americans framed Chinese slogans that read: "Revere the Emperor, Banish the Barbarian." Ishikawa's account of his cultural and sentimental education, of his personal disillusionment and triumphs, is funny, ribald, and sometimes discomfiting. Winner of the prestigious Ohya Nonfiction Award and an enormous best-seller in Japan, Strawberry Road is a vivid reminder that the American melting pot is still stewing in unpredictable ways. Language Notes Text: English (translation) Original Language: Japanese About the Author Yoshimi Ishikawa received a law degree from Keio University and is the author of many books in Japanese. His critical interests are far-ranging and touch upon almost every aspect of modern life. Excerpted from Strawberry Road by Yoshimi Ishikawa, Eve Zimmerman. Two days had passed since our first faint glimpse of the continent, and our ship was still inching toward the port of Los Angeles. A middle-aged passenger flicked his cigarette overboard, grumbling, "This ship is really getting to me. We've seen land and now this." The year was 1965. Our journey had begun on a day in early April, after the cherry blossoms had scattered and all of Japan was turning green; friends and relatives had seen us off, showering us with best wishes and mountains of streamers. Our ship, however, was not a honeymoon cruiser, or fishing ship or battleship--it was an immigrant ship and had none of the luxuries of a passenger ship. We slept like sardines in its dark hold, unaware of how much this journey would change our lives. Fellow passengers grew close almost overnight, confiding their dreams to one another. Once the islands had disappeared, we felt awed by the expanse of the Pacific and the beauty of the stars overhead. But soon we grew uneasy as we made our solitary way through the sea, and grumpy at the monotony of the scenery. Week after week, we saw nothing but water. Eventually, we stopped going up on deck altogether and spent the days moping in the ship's dim hold. Then one day a loud voice rang through the cabin: "I see America!" Notes: Very Nice Condition ! very clean crisp tight copy, no marks or tears, LIKE NEW. DUSTJACKET BACK COVER HAS SOME SCRATCHES. 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